Lucian Niemeyer

CEO

BIO

Lucian serves as the Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Building Cyber Security, a non-profit organization established in 2020 to enhance global safety by developing frameworks with stakeholders across multiple sectors to promote cyber protections in operational technologies, controls, and devices for enhanced human security and safety in an increasingly smart world. In this role, he applies his expertise and experience in the convergence of facilities, real estate, and technology to counter emerging global threats.

Prior to this appointment, Lucian served in the White House as the Deputy Program Associate Director in the Office of Management and Budget providing budgetary, policy, and management oversight for all U.S. national security programs of the Department of Defense, the National Nuclear Security Agency, and National Intelligence Programs.

In August 2017, he was appointed by the President as an Assistant Secretary of Defense to lead and manage the budgeting, development, and operations of the Department of Defense’s real property portfolio, which encompasses 28 million acres on 500 installations with over 500,000 buildings valued at a trillion dollars. Lucian was responsible for identifying and mitigating risk to national security programs, as well as improving energy and environmental resilience, in the construction, sustainment, and modernization of facilities and related infrastructure. He also represented the Department in all major real estate acquisitions, transfers, protections, and divestitures, working with communities around the world to promote compatible economic development. Lucian also served the Secretary of Defense as a strategic advisor for critical mission assurance and cybersecurity programs, and as an Assistant Secretary of the Navy.

Lucian also founded in 2014 and currently directs The Niemeyer Group, LLC providing public and private sector clients strategic advisory services for economic and business development. From 2003 to 2014 he served on the professional staff of the United States Senate Committee on Armed Services responsible for legislative and budget oversight over a wide portfolio of national security programs.

Lucian is an Air Force veteran with 21 years of active and Virginia Air National Guard service. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture, from the University of Notre Dame, a Master of Business Administration from The George Washington University, and a Master of National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College. He was also appointed a Fellow in the Society of American Military Engineers.

Wednesday, June 16, 2021

Smart Building Market Growth & Technologies that Bring New Challenges to Buildings Owners

Rapid investments in integrated Operational Technologies (OT) enabling smart facilities, machines, and industries for a more efficient and convenient world are not being complimented by a commensurate safety security framework designed to protect lives, privacy, and resources across all applications.

Why This Matters? - While an IT attack can threaten data, intellectual property and privacy, an OT attack can threaten lives in cars, at work, at home, and in utilities and infrastructure.

According to a recent study by Gartner, the leading enterprise sector research and advisory company, financial impact of physical cyber-attacks will continue to rise, with the total cost reaching $50 billion by 2023 in compensation, regulatory fines, and reputation loss (costs do not account for the value of human life) and liabilities ultimately extending to 75% of CEOs by 2024. Cybersecurity Ventures expects global cybercrime costs to grow by 15 percent per year over the next five years, reaching $10.5 trillion annually by 2025. According to Cybersecurity Ventures, this represents the greatest transfer of economic wealth in history.

Key Topics Covered:

• Issues, Problems & Solutions for mitigating attacks on building operational assets and systems that could threaten safety or health.

• Do you have the cybersecurity foundation to thwart attacks on your building’s operational technology assets (OT)?

• Are your building systems protected from exploitation that could threaten the safety or health of occupants?

• What are our cyber weaknesses with those technologies, and what are we doing to reduce risk?

• What physical security improvements, if any, should we make to better secure our IT and OT assets?

• How should we prepare to survive a cyber incident and recover quickly?